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Do What You Gotta Do - Roberta Flack - Chapter Two (Vinyl, LP, Album)

8 thoughts on “ Do What You Gotta Do - Roberta Flack - Chapter Two (Vinyl, LP, Album)

  1. Apr 28,  · The problem with this album as with nearly all of Miss Flack's Lps, is that it is of two minds. The first side kicks off with a down-in-the-bar version of Gene McDaniels' "Reverend Lee", and follows with wonderful re-workings of Jim Webb, Bob Dylan and Everly Brothers classics/5().
  2. Released: August 12, Recorded: December 8–9, , March–April First Take () Chapter Two () Quiet Fire ()Genre: Jazz, gospel, R&B.
  3. May 24,  · The problem with this album as with nearly all of Miss Flack's Lps, is that it is of two minds. The first side kicks off with a down-in-the-bar version of Gene McDaniels' "Reverend Lee", and follows with wonderful re-workings of Jim Webb, Bob Dylan and Everly Brothers classics/5().
  4. You feel the world differently after listening to it. Her just released second album, Chapter Two, is successful, but not wholly. Again there is one uptempo cut, and, again, it is the first one, "Reverend Lee." Listening to it, one wishes for Aretha. Roberta Flack is simply .
  5. Do What You Gotta Do Lyrics: Do what you gotta do / Come on back see me when you can / Man, I can understand how it might be / Kinda hard to love a girl like me / I don't blame you much for.
  6. Roberta Flack is one of those voices. Although a solid Album throughout, it took the world a while to warm up to Roberta's talents. Along with the album "First Take", "Chapter Two" was also alongside Curtis Mayfield's "Superfly" & Marvin Gaye's "What's Going /5(44).
  7. A great album and the release that made Roberta Flack a major soul and R&B artist in the early '70s. She had a soft, compelling, alluring voice, and was able to convincingly switch gears and also convey anger, regret, hurt, or despair.
  8. 50 years ago this month, Roberta Flack released her sophomore album, an LP which – despite failing to match the crazy commercial success of her debut, FIRST TAKE, with mainstream audiences – still packed a solid emotional punch and served to cement her superstar status on the R&B and jazz charts. Mind you, at this point, FIRST TAKE hadn’t actually become a crazy commercial success.

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